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Deschutes Chainbreaker Clone Homebrew Recipe

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June 20, 2014 by fhsteinbart


When the warmer days of Summer begin to cast their long rays of bountiful sunshine in the Pacific Northwest, beer drinkers begin to thirst for those thirst quenching beers of the season. IPA’s have been on the upswing for many years now, and new emergent styles have hybridized this stalwart style into many sub­styles. New among them are the “White” IPA’s, or wheat based beers with a firm hop bitterness, and a strong hop character, yet fuller bodied and with more mouthfeel. This blog will focus on what has become the benchmark of the style: Chainbreaker White IPA. Below is a recipe for making five gallons of extract, and all grain batches of this fine beer. All times are a countdown from beginning of the boil to knockout.

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Ingredients for all grain:

61⁄2lbs. Pilsner Malt

21⁄4 lbs. White Wheat Malt (This is what makes it a “White” IPA!)

11⁄2 lbs. Unmalted Wheat Flakes ( Gives you better head retention and mouth­feel)

1⁄2 oz. Calcium (Gypsum or Brewing salts) in mash

3⁄4 oz. Bravo Pellets (15% AA ~ 60 minutes with 1⁄2 oz. Brewing salts or Gypsum in boil)

5 oz. Dextrose (30 minutes)

1 Whirlfloc Tablet (20 Minutes)

1/8 oz. Ground Coriander (This will make for more emphasis on the late hop character in the last 5 minutes)

1/3 oz. Ground Bitter Orange Peel (This will make for more emphasis on the late hop character in the last 5 minutes)

1 oz. Citra Pellets (Knockout)

1 oz. Centennial Pellets (Knockout)

1⁄2 oz. Cascade Pellets (Knockout)

Wyeast 3787 Trappist High Gravity Ale Yeast

Directions:

Mix grains with hot liquor in a ratio of 1­1/3 qts. water to every pound of grain at a temperature of 160° F, stabilizing at 150° F for 1 hour.

Ferment at 66° F for two days, then allow temperature to rise to 74° F. Rack and condition for 5 to 7 days before packaging.

Extract Version:

Substitute 51⁄4 lbs. Extra­Light LME for the pilsner malt and 21⁄2 lbs. Wheat LME for the malted and unmalted wheat. Make sure to dissolve all extracts completely before proceeding with the boil.

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